Recent Searches
Clear

Things to Do in Germany

Germany offers a path for every kind of traveler, whether it leads toward the castles of Neuschwanstein and Linderhof, a glass of local wine in Rhine Valley, or across to Austria's Salzburg Lake District, an area synonymous with the Von Trapp family and The Sound of Music. For history buffs, stories of the Cold War abound in Berlin, and day trips to World War II memorial sites offer a somber and significant look at the past. If you find yourself in Munich in the fall it can only mean one thing: a stop at Oktoberfest, the world’s largest beer festival, for a taste of Bavarian brews, culture, and food.
Read More
Category

Zugspitze
star-5
89
10 Tours and Activities

Located close to the Austrian border and soaring to a height of 9,718 feet (2,962 meters), the snow-crowned Zugspitze is Germany's highest mountain and one of its most popular ski resorts. The views from the top are spectacular, spanning the German and Austrian Alps.

Read More
Mercedes-Benz Museum
star-5
32
3 Tours and Activities

Spread across nine levels and showcasing over 160 rare vehicles and car-related artifacts, Stuttgart’s Mercedes-Benz Museum is a must-visit destination for automotive enthusiasts. Debuted in 2006 next to the city’s Daimler factory, the museum is also an architectural marvel, thanks to its sleek, double-helix design.

Read More
Documentation Center Nazi Party Rally Grounds
star-5
791
23 Tours and Activities

A vast tract of untended land southeast of Nuremberg's medieval city center, the Nazi Party Rally Grounds were once the stage for some of Adolf Hitler's most infamous and dangerous speeches during the rise of the Third Reich. The nearby Documentation Center museum chronicles the terrors inflicted by the Nazi party during World War II.

Read More
St. Thomas Church (Thomaskirche)
star-5
58
9 Tours and Activities

One of two places of worship in the center of Leipzig, St. Thomas Church is home to the remains of composer Johann Sebastian Bach, who once worked as the church’s music director. The current building dates to the end of the 15th century, and the roof above its vaulted ceiling is one of the steepest in Germany. Martin Luther preached at St. Thomas on Pentecost Sunday in 1539, but the church may be best known for the St. Thomas Boys’ Choirs founded centuries earlier, in 1212.

A 223-foot (68-m) church tower rises above the surrounding skyline, featuring four bells that ring hourly and on the quarter hour. The church contains two organs, one of which was built in semblance to Bach's in the Paulinekirche—as well as a Gothic altar. Next to the church is a sculpture of Bach, added in 1908.

Read More
Dresden Frauenkirche
star-5
1063
23 Tours and Activities

The Frauenkirche in Dresden was built between 1726 and 1743. Its dome collapsed on Feb. 15, 1945, during the bombings of World War II. After the war, the ruins of the church were left as a war memorial. Once Dresden and the rest of East Germany were reunified with West Germany, reconstruction on the church began and was completed by 2005. As much as possible, the reconstruction of the church followed the original plans and methods and used the original materials. The church now serves as a symbol of reconciliation.

The reconstruction of the church was supported by donations from people all around the world. In order to honor those who donated, the church set up an exhibition area, which explains what was left after the destruction and what was was needed to start the rebuilding process. The exhibit includes original documents and finds from the archaeological site. Photographs and sketches outline the process from when the reconstruction idea was made public until the consecration of the church in 2005. There is also a computer to search for names of supporters.

A variety of guided tours of the church are available, and visitors can also climb the tower for views of the city.

Read More
Dusseldorf Old Town (Altstadt)
star-4.5
57
9 Tours and Activities

The traditional heart of the city and one of Germany’s most famous nightlife districts, Dusseldorf’s Old Town (Altstadt) is where visitors spend the majority of their time, home to many of the city’s top attractions. As well as the scenic Rheinuferpromenade running along the waterfront and the famous Königsallee shopping boulevard just a couple of blocks east, highlights of the Old Town include the Burgplatz, with its landmark castle tower and unique City Monument; the Neander-church and Old City Hall (Rathaus), two of the only buildings still standing after WWII; and a number of museums, including the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen and the Filmmuseum.

The historic district is at its most atmospheric in the evening hours when locals and tourists gather to drink and dance at “the longest bar in the world” – the nickname given to the almost 300 bars, bier-halles and pubs that stretch throughout the area, built so close together that the bar counters are said to run from one venue to the next. There’s a huge range of nightclubs, music venues and cocktail bars to choose from, but be sure to head to one of the traditional brew pubs to sample local specialty, Altbier, a dark beer brewed in Dusseldorf since the 19th century.

Read More
Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom)
star-4.5
619
34 Tours and Activities

With its imposing Gothic façade and dramatic twin towers, the Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom) is the city’s most recognized landmark. Protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the magnificent cathedral is one of the most important in Germany and dominates the city skyline.

Read More
Karl-Theodor-Bridge (Alte Brucke)
star-5
77
12 Tours and Activities

The Karl-Theodor-Bridge (Alte Brucke) in Heidelberg is a sandstone pedestrian bridge that goes across the Neckar River linking the old town on one side with the Neuenheim district on the other. It was built in 1786, and even though there were several other bridges before it in this location, it was the first one made of stone. On the city side of the bridge, there are two towers that once formed part of the city walls. They contain old dungeons which were used to hold criminals. Between the towers, you can see a plaque honoring the Austrian troops who helped defend the bridge against an attack from the French in 1799.

Another feature visitors will notice is a statue of a monkey holding a mirror. The monkey represents the idea that neither those who lived within the city walls nor those who lived outside the city were any better than the other, and that they should look over their shoulder as the cross the bridge to remember this. Other sculptures on the bridge include a monument to Prince Elector Carl Theodor, who had the bridge built, and one devoted to the Roman goddess Minerva.

Read More
Holsten Gate (Holstentor)
star-5
16
6 Tours and Activities

The Holsten Gate (Holstentor), a medieval city gate that marks the border of Old Town in Lübeck, Germany is known for its two imposing iron-clad turrets. Dating back to 1464, the landmark—which is also known as the Crooked Gate due to the seemingly sunken south tower—is now home to a museum about Lübeck’s medieval past.

Read More
New Palace (Neues Palais)
star-5
193
12 Tours and Activities

The Neues Palais (New Palace) is the largest 18th-century structure in Potsdam’s Sanssouci Park. Situated on the western side of the park, the building was completed under Prussian King Friedrich II in 1769. It is the last palace that Frederick the Great built in the Potsdam park grounds — no further baroque palaces were built in Germany after this one. Once the royal residence during the German Empire (1871-1918), the New Palace is made up of opulent main reception rooms, beautiful galleries, and luxurious royal apartments.

Today, the New Palace is home to the University of Potsdam’s philosophy department, and various other institutes. Out of the 200 palatial rooms, some 60 can be viewed by visitors. Among these are the Grottensaal (Grotto Hall), the Marmorgalerie (Marble Gallery), and the guest apartments. The Visitor’s Hall is located in the historic Südtorgebäude (South Tower), and is a reception point for groups of visitors as well as a multimedia information center for adults and for children. A bronze model located here allows blind and visually impaired visitors to literally get a feel for the park. The New Palace also has an on-site restaurant (Fredersdorf), which combines the fresh, modern kitchen with a royal backdrop.

Read More

More Things to Do in Germany

Old Stone Bridge

Old Stone Bridge

star-4.5
5
4 Tours and Activities

The Old Stone Bridge in Regensburg, Germany is a medieval bridge that was constructed in a Romanesque style in the mid 1100s. It crosses the Danube River connecting the old town to the Stadtamhof, and for more than 800 years, it was the city's only bridge across the river. For several centuries, Regensburg was a major center of trade and government due to this bridge because it was the only crossing over the Danube between Ulm, Germany and Vienna, Austria.

Visitors today can see 15 arches on the bridge, although there once was a 16th arch. Three towers were once connected to the bridge, but one was damaged by ice and torn down in the late 1700s and another was damaged during the war in 1810 and torn down. One tower remains, the Schuldturm, on the city side of the bridge, and it is now a museum. On this tower you can see two clocks and a painting depicting the 30 Year Battle. Although vehicles were once allowed on the bridge, it is now a pedestrian and bicycle bridge.

Learn More
Elbphilharmonie

Elbphilharmonie

star-5
1188
35 Tours and Activities

Opened in 2017, the Elbphilharmonie (Elbe Philharmonic) is a striking work of modern architecture on the banks of the Elbe River in Hamburg. Made with 1,096 individual glass panes, it houses two concert halls, as well as a hotel and residential apartments. The halls’ acoustics are considered among the best in the world.

Learn More
Reichstag

Reichstag

star-5
10392
143 Tours and Activities

The seat of Germany’s Parliament and one of Berlin’s most recognizable landmarks, the Reichstag building is an impressive feat of 19th-century architecture, with a futuristic glass dome and classical columns on its facade. The structure stands proudly on the River Spree’s southern bank, a stoic reminder of Berlin’s turbulent history.

Learn More
Panometer

Panometer

star-5
7

Housed in a former gas storage tank, the Leipzig Panometer was created in 2003 to display the artworks of panorama artist Yadegar Asisi. Today there are two Panometers showcasing his unique, immersive work (the other is in Dresden), and Asisi’s pieces can be seen on display around the world.

Learn More
Hannover Adventure Zoo (Erlebnis Zoo Hannover)

Hannover Adventure Zoo (Erlebnis Zoo Hannover)

1 Tour and Activity

Escape the city for the wilderness at the Hanover Adventure Zoo (Erlebnis Zoo Hannover), where themed zones re-create some of the world’s most spectacular wildlife destinations. Animal lovers can travel from Canada's Yukon Bay to the African Savannah or the Australian Outback and spot more than 3,000 animals—all within the city limits.

Learn More
Neuschwanstein Castle

Neuschwanstein Castle

star-4.5
8187
57 Tours and Activities

With its snow-white limestone facade and fanciful turrets peeking out from the forested mountain tops of the Hohenschwangau valley, Neuschwanstein Castle (Schloss Neuschwanstein) could easily have been lifted from the pages of a fairy tale. In a way, it has—the German castle famously inspired Disney'sSleeping Beauty castle.

Learn More
Freiburg im Breisgau

Freiburg im Breisgau

star-4
19
8 Tours and Activities

Spectacular and historic Freiburg im Breisgau, commonly known just as Freiburg, sits on the edge of the mountainous Black Forest in southern Germany, a photogenic old city that was founded in 1120 that lays claim to having the most sunshine in the whole country. Life in this vibrant university city centers on the Altstadt’s cobbled and arcaded Rathausplatz (City Square), lined with Gothic churches and civic buildings interspersed with buzzy cafés and bars. The tangle of surrounding streets are stuffed full of medieval buildings, from half-timbered and gabled townhouses to the massive 11th-century Gothic Münster (Minister) encrusted with sculptured biblical scenes and adorned with dazzling stained-glass windows. One of the Freiburg’s stranger constructions is the bizarre Stühlinger Kirche (Stühlinger church), completed in 1897 and topped with bright-green tiled spires.

Freiburg’s proximity to the Black Forest National Park makes it the number-one base from which to explore its vineyards, pretty villages, crystal-clear lakes and scenic hiking trails; several way-marked walks begin at the Schlossbergbahn cable-car station just outside town. It is also close to Germany’s answer to Disneyland; Europa-Park is located near Freiburg at Rust, and has a vast array of rides, shows and amusements for a day packed with family fun.

Learn More
Topography of Terror

Topography of Terror

star-5
6659
90 Tours and Activities

A history museum of the Third Reich, Topography of Terror is housed in the former headquarters of the Gestapo secret police and the SS. Artifacts, photos, and videos examine the history of Hitler’s Germany on the site where the fate of Nazi political opponents was decided and the genocide of the European Jews, Sinti, and Roma was organized.

Learn More
Berlin Wall

Berlin Wall

star-5
7848
104 Tours and Activities

At the height of the Cold War in 1961, socialist East Germany erected the Berlin Wall as an imposing concrete barrier that divided Berlin's eastern and western sides for nearly 30 years. In 1989, toward the end of the war and the fall of East Germany and communism in Europe, the wall's demolition began, thus reunifying Germany. Today, sections of the wall remain as permanent reminders of the days when the country (and Berlin) was divided.

Learn More
Eagle's Nest (Kehlsteinhaus)

Eagle's Nest (Kehlsteinhaus)

star-4.5
1675
31 Tours and Activities

Just an hour’s drive outside of Salzburg lies the alpine town of Berchtesgaden and the historic Eagle’s Nest (Kehlsteinhaus), Adolf Hitler’s mountaintop chalet and the former southern headquarters of the Nazi party. Perched atop Mt. Kehlstein, Eagle’s Nest offers a dark history and panoramic views of Germany’s Bavarian Alps.

Learn More
Hohenzollern Bridge (Hohenzollernbrücke)

Hohenzollern Bridge (Hohenzollernbrücke)

star-4.5
281
7 Tours and Activities

The waters of the mighty Rhine split Cologne in half, and the city is united across a series of seven bridges, with none more splendid than the spans of the Hohenzollernbrücke, which stretch 1,342 feet (410 meters) across the river in three great steel arches.

This spectacular city landmark is almost as famous as Cologne’s twin-spired Gothic cathedral – the largest in Europe – and was completed in 1911, with four railway lines joining Cologne to cities across Europe. German troops destroyed the bridge at the end of World War II in the face of advancing Allied soldiers but it rose phoenix-like once more in 1948. Today it is both a pedestrian and rail bridge with around 1,200 trains passing over it daily and pairs of equestrian bronzes punctuating both ends.

A curious tradition has recently grown up around the Hohenzollernbrücke; lovers affix padlocks to its sides and throw the key into the Rhine in exchange for eternal love. So far the city fathers believe over two tonnes of extra metal is now attached to the bridge.

Learn More
Imperial Castle of Nuremberg (Kaiserburg)

Imperial Castle of Nuremberg (Kaiserburg)

star-5
935
16 Tours and Activities

Built in 1120, Imperial Castle of Nuremberg (Kaiserburg) was once a residence for kings of the Holy Roman Empire. Despite suffering damage over the years (especially during WWII), the castle has been carefully restored to showcase its original Gothic and Romanesque architecture.

Learn More
Harburg

Harburg

star-5
660
6 Tours and Activities

With the majestic Harburg Castle looming on a hilltop above the scenic River Wörnitz and a cluster of half-timbered buildings that appear plucked from medieval times, the sleepy town of Harburg entices many Romantic Road travelers to pull over. It’s impossible to miss the castle from the roadside, and with its backdrop of forested hillsides and fairytale turrets reflected in the waters below, it’s a magnificent photo opportunity.

Exploring the 11th-century castle is the main highlight of a visit and it’s possible to tour the castle house, chapel, ballroom and dungeons, as well as taking in the views from the guard towers. After visiting the castle, cross the old stone bridge into the small town of Harburg and wander around the maze of medieval lanes, stopping to admire the grand Town Hall on Rathausplatz, where the town’s annual Christmas market is held, or escape into the surrounding countryside, where there’s a network of hiking and biking trails.

Learn More
Regensburg Cathedral (St Peter Cathedral)

Regensburg Cathedral (St Peter Cathedral)

star-4
44
5 Tours and Activities

The Regensburg Cathedral is the most important church in the city and is dedicated to St. Peter. It is one of the most recognizable landmarks in Regensburg and its two tall spires can be seen from all around the city. It is one of the best examples of Gothic church architecture in Bavaria. Though a church was once at this location since the year 700, the one that you see today was completed in the early 1300s. Over the centuries the cathedral underwent several renovations including the addition of Baroque elements.

On the north side of the cathedral you can visit the Bishop's Palace, which is now the Treasury Museum. The square to the west is called Domplatz. The west portal of the cathedral is decorated with arches, canopies, and several sculptures depicting scenes from the bible. Nearly 100 images of St. Peter can be found both outside and inside the cathedral. Visitors can also admire the large number of detailed stained glass windows that have managed to survive since the Middle Ages.

Learn More