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Primate's Palace (Primaciálny Palác)
Primate's Palace (Primaciálny Palác)

Primate's Palace (Primaciálny Palác)

Primaciálne námestie 1, Bratislava, Slovakia

The Basics

Walking through Bratislava’s Old Town, you can’t miss the stunning Primate's Palace (sometimes also translated as Primatial Palace), just off the main square. The palace is open to the public and features a spectacular House of Mirrors, a fountain, a statue of St. George slaying a dragon, and a sumptuous collection of English tapestries from the 17th century.

Most walking tours in Bratislava pass by and discuss the role of the Primate's Palace in Slovakian history. You can also book a private tour of Bratislava for a more in-depth look at its history and a chance to customize the itinerary based on your interests. Private day trips from Budapest to Bratislava are also available.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Primate's Palace is a must for architecture fans and anyone who loves to explore palaces.

  • The palace hosts a number of classical music concerts throughout the year in the grand House of Mirrors.

  • Visitors generally spend about three hours exploring the palace.

  • Free Wi-Fi is available in the Primatial Square.

  • The palace is wheelchair accessible and features a lift to the 3rd-floor courtyard.

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How to Get There

The Primate's Palace is located in the pedestrian-only zone of Old Town Bratislava. Take tram 1, 7, 8 or 9 to the Namestie stop, or tram 4 or 6 to the SND stop, both a 5-minute walk to the palace.

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When to Get There

The palace is open from 10am to 5pm Tuesday through Sunday, with the busiest time being around midday. The best time to visit the Primatial Palace, and Bratislava in general, is between May and September, when the weather is pleasant.

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From Napoleon to Present Day

The Peace of Pressburg, signed in the Primate's Palace, marked the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire, and Bratislava was ruled by Emperor Francis I of Austria. The palace is also where Ferdinand V of Hungary established the first trustworthy Hungarian government and signed the April Laws, which helped to modernize the Kingdom of Hungary into a nation-state. In 1903, the city of Bratislava purchased the palace, which served as the seat of the president of Slovakia until 1996.

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